History of Asclepius

Asclepius
Asclepius

"Asclepius healing powers were so strong that he could even raise the dead."

Asclepius was the ancient Greek god of medicine and he was also credited with powers of prophecy. The god had several sanctuaries across Greece; the most famous was at Epidaurus which became an important centre of healing in both ancient Greek and Roman times and was the site of athletic, dramatic, and musical Games held in Asclepius’ honour every four years.

 

The descendants of Asclepius, who continued in the art of medicine and healing, were known as the Asclepiads. Machaon, for example, helped Menelaos when he was wounded in the Trojan War, but the most famous doctor of the family was undoubtedly Hippocrates

Asclepius met a tragic end when he was killed by a thunderbolt thrown by Zeus. This was because the father of the gods saw Asclepius and his medical skills as a threat to the eternal division between humanity and the gods. 

The only reason today that children with cancer are able to continue with life is through the development of modern medicine.  It was only fitting for this organization to be named after the god of medicine as physicians, PAs, NPs, and nurses all work as a team to provide comfort and healing just as Asclepius did in the past.

Reference

Cartwright, M. (20 June 2013). Asclepius. Ancient History Encyclopedia. https://www.ancient.eu/Asclepius/

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